4.5 Mb per second is now the global average connection speed to the Internet

The adoption rate globally for broadband Internet connections of 4 Mb per second or greater hit 60% of all connections.

4.5 Mb per second is now the global average connection speed to the Internet and IPv6 expansion continues. In a report from Akamai Internet adoption growth is slowing in the United States but around the world there is more broadband Internet penetration than ever and the growth rate there is growing.

The adoption rate globally for broadband Internet connections of 4 Mb per second or greater hit 60% of all connections in the third quarter of 2014. This is a year-over-year growth rate of 12% and clearly the overall trend is positive. Internet connection speeds themselves are also growing along with the broadband adoption rate and again during the third quarter the average connection speed was up 25% for the year. At 24.8 Mb per second the average peak connection speed is also trending up at an increase of 38% for the year. Although up for the year this is a 2.3% decline for the quarter.

IPv6 is on the rise and the highest percentage of increase globally is in Belgium. A 27% increase for the quarter and a 45% quarter over quarter gain in Belgium shows dramatic positive growth. Germany ranked in second at 11% with 87% quarterly growth. IPv6 traffic was 9.5% in the United States which ranked at number three in the world during the third quarter of 2014. This is a 40% quarterly gain and the major Internet carriers are all pushing to expand IPv6 usage.

Verizon wireless clocked in at 56% of all traffic being IPv6 and Comcast showed a 19% traffic share. 15% IPv6 usage on AT&T showed positive growth and Time Warner cable showed only 8.89% of its traffic provided by IPv6.

Jon Norwood at Mobile Informers said, "Growth in this industry is punctuated by slow steady growth coupled by massive leaps and bounds as technology changes. The LTE network show this to be true when they can offer a gigabyte down over a wireless connection people will go crazy for this and throw money at it virtually all over the world". It's funny to think that traditional Internet service providers are having a problem competing with wireless speeds both up and down stream. Only five years ago this would've been unthinkable as wireless speeds were terrible by comparison. IPv6 may be the answer, or it may not be but the US carriers certainly think it is and they're expanding with that in mind.